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Placing a Hand for Mental Health

Contact Group's State Construction Manager, Nick Tsiaousis, and General Manager, Dion Frame, stand alongside Hansen Yuncken's State Construction Manager, Julian Proud.
Contact Group’s State Construction Manager, Nick Tsiaousis, and General Manager, Dion Frame, stand alongside Hansen Yuncken’s State Construction Manager, Julian Proud.

Contact Group was proud to stand alongside Hansen Yuncken employees recently for a great initiative in support of mental health.

Hansen Yuncken is the lead Contractor on the $9.6 million Peacock Centre redevelopment and Contact Group is carrying out the installation of a state-of-the-art hydronic heating system.

With construction work once again in full swing, the project team commenced an initiative to show support for the very purpose of the mental health facility, by placing a permanent hand mark on the lining of the building.

The Peacock Centre is being cladded with a charred timber product, so staff rubbed their hands on timber offcuts, and placed their sooted handprints on the sisalation lining, along with their names.

Ultimately the sisalation will be covered up by the external cladding and the handprints, names and positive comments written by project personnel will be left as a legacy of the build – to support mental health awareness.

Contact Group’s General Manager, Dion Frame, said it was a terrific initiative to be a part of that had already sparked positive conversations with staff about mental health and reducing the stigma.

“A big thanks to Hansen Yuncken for inviting us to be part of this initiative and for setting a great example promoting mental health in the construction industry,” he said.

Contact Group has been working at the Peacock Centre site since mid-last year installing the hydronic heating system.

The system uses the heat from outside air, to exchange heat to the water that is pumped around the building to keep the occupants warm by the way of slab heating and radiators.

All air that is exhausted from the building is exhausted through a heat recovery unit to recover as much lost heat as possible.

After several setbacks, the project is now expected to be completed by the end of the year.